Sunday, 27 May 2018 12:10

The virtues of gardening

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Spring has arrived! The earth is about to enjoy greater warmth and new life awakening within it.

When surrounded by vitality, be it a newborn child, a beloved animal, a cheerful friend or a bright sunny day, life is wonderful. Create a garden and yet another wonderful dimension of life’s richness is added.

Spring has arrived! The earth is about to enjoy greater warmth and new life awakening within it.

When surrounded by vitality, be it a newborn child, a beloved animal, a cheerful friend or a bright sunny day, life is wonderful. Create a garden and yet another wonderful dimension of life’s richness is added.

For those who haven’t as yet planted a garden, give it a try, marvel as little seeds grow into plants and enjoy tasty homegrown food.

You may say, “I haven’t the means for planting a garden.” No problem! There are now easy to manage plants designed to be grown indoors. For example, there are tomato plants that grow upside down on a trellis, take up little space and are as delicious as being grown outdoors.

Options for starting a garden exist if we look. People with access to their roof have created rooftop gardens. Not only do they produce vegetables and herbs, but roof gardens insulate the house and utilize free rainwater.

In cities people are discovering vacant lots that have been converted into neighborhood gardens.

In some places gardens have been designed for people with disabilities to fit their particular needs.

Gardening is intriguing because it teaches us to cherish time cycles. Lettuce and radishes enjoy early spring planting because they thrive in cooler weather. The hotter the weather, the “hotter” are radishes.

Studying plant time cycles remind us of our time cycles. Plants teach us the art of taking time for good results, a practice difficult to follow in our rushed times.

No doubt many of us work long hours and just want to come home, relax and avoid thinking of work.

When I was a child, my grandfather would go to work early in the morning with his spade and mattock. His were the tools of a sewer contractor that enabled him to dig ditches and lay clay sewage pipes. When he returned home, he would work on our World War II victory garden.

Even though genes are responsible for our health to a great degree, I believe part of his good health came from working outdoors and his love of gardening. Not only were they an excellent way to stay conditioned, but they produced fresh vegetables that we canned and enjoyed throughout the year.

More in this category: « Hope in the year 2018