Sunday, 28 October 2018 14:38

The plan of life — Establishing holiness Featured

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Past articles of A disciple’s journey to holiness have offered systematic information of some of the truths of our faith to guide us to a personal knowledge and relationship with our Lord. Knowledge of the Lord is good. Yet, this good is also designed to achieve something even more magnificent — holiness. So, it may be helpful to discuss a very practical way to synthesize what we have said thus far and put it to good use. To do this, let us discuss and understand what spiritual writers mean by the term “plan of life.”

Past articles of A disciple’s journey to holiness have offered systematic information of some of the truths of our faith to guide us to a personal knowledge and relationship with our Lord. Knowledge of the Lord is good. Yet, this good is also designed to achieve something even more magnificent — holiness. So, it may be helpful to discuss a very practical way to synthesize what we have said thus far and put it to good use. To do this, let us discuss and understand what spiritual writers mean by the term “plan of life.”

The phrase “plan of life” has been used to point out one compelling fact of spiritual growth: Without a plan, holiness is impossible. Trying to achieve our spiritual goal, namely, union with God, without planning the means of attaining it is like a person who begins a journey without having a roadmap or directions. The result could only be finding oneself lost, forsaken, confused and in a condition of despair. A “plan of life” is as it sounds — a practical way for souls to organize the details of their life in such a way as to achieve their end and their goal.

Our end is holiness. How often is it the case, however, that in addition to failing to plan properly for this end, many people also fail to establish holiness as their goal because of mistaken notions?

Holiness, many say, is solely about self-denial, repression, renunciation and things to be avoided. Thus, holiness seems entirely repugnant when compared with the good things of the world. Hence, when the prospect of having fun and excitement is pitted against a life immersed in the dull, bland, and perhaps even bitter aspects, the goal of holiness is abandoned before it has even begun. So, let us first correct the false notion of holiness. Then we will set about the task of designing our own plan in a way that seems achievable. In this way, we will discover the great adventure and joy of a holy life.

Read 65 times
Marlene Mulford

Marlene Mulford, director of the Office for Communications, can be contacted at .

www.dio.org/chancellor