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Sunday, 03 March 2019 00:55

Penance and Purification

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Lust, gluttony, avarice and sloth of the seven deadly sins

In the previous issue we examined the deadly sins of pride, anger and envy. We continue that examination of the seven deadly sins with those of lust, gluttony, avarice and sloth. The purpose is to enable an honest evaluation of our weaknesses and begin to take steps toward a positive change in our lives and to embrace our Lord’s mercy and forgiveness.

Lust, gluttony, avarice and sloth of the seven deadly sins

In the previous issue we examined the deadly sins of pride, anger and envy. We continue that examination of the seven deadly sins with those of lust, gluttony, avarice and sloth. The purpose is to enable an honest evaluation of our weaknesses and begin to take steps toward a positive change in our lives and to embrace our Lord’s mercy and forgiveness.

Lust:

This is when an individual treats another person as an object or instrument for one’s own sexual desires and gratification. Lust robs the victim of his or her dignity, thus degrading and dehumanizing that person.

Gluttony:

This deadly sin refers to a lack of temperance or control with food and drink. With respect to eating, we have to keep in mind that although it is possible to sin by eating to excess — because it is unhealthy or because someone else may be entitled to the food — we can also be gluttonous by eating too little, acting finicky or being attached to certain foods.

Avarice:

This is greed. Avarice is a disordered desire of attainment and possession. Although this can revolve around material goods, it can also take the form of an excessive longing for position, knowledge or notoriety. Avarice seeks to find security in worldly means instead of in God.

Sloth:

This is laziness. Sloth is being bothered or disturbed by the extent to which God has called us because we deem it involves too much work. We would rather be left alone than have God expect so much from us.

Next Issue: Penance and purification: discovering our predominant fault.

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Marlene Mulford

Marlene Mulford, director of the Office for Communications, can be contacted at .

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